Tuesday, September 30, 2014

"Try It Different" Tuesday: Spritzed Acetate Backgrounds

I'd say that 99% of the time, I begin a card by stamping my image onto white cardstock and then coloring it in with my favorite medium (colored pencils blended with Gamsol, of course). I certainly love this look and will never tire of it!

But every once in a while, it's fun to try something different, like today's projects made by Debbie Fisher. Take this delightful scarecrow card, for example, which contains stamps from 11196MC Autumn Fields Clear Set (drawn by artist Nancy Baier):


See that beautifully soft yet vibrant background? It's such a neat look because the colors remain distinctive while also melding into each other where they meet. Perhaps the best part is that it's so easy to do!

Debbie's first step was to apply wide bands of color onto acetate (Clear Cardstock would also work) using water-based markers, beginning with the lightest color and following with darker colors:
 

Next, she spritzed the acetate with a fine mist of water:


Then Debbie placed her tag face-down onto the watery, colored acetate. After carefully lifting the tag and allowing it to dry completely, she stamped and colored as usual. 

Here's another example using other stamps from that same clear set:


You may have noticed this week's card on the main Inky website features the same spritzed acetate background:


Change your markers, and you'll get completely different results:


The cool palette that Debbie chose above works great with the little Frankie from 11193MC Halloween Monsters HoneyPOP Clear Set (drawn by artist Tammy DeYoung). Very Halloweenie, don't you think? What kind of card will YOU try spritzing, Inky friends?

4 comments:

stamping sue said...

Halloween! but I'm sure it would work with any occasion.
stamping sue
http://stampingsueinconnecticut.blogspot.com/

Mary-Anne V said...

I think I want to use some gold spritzing on my Christmas cards.

Sue D said...

This background is perfect for Fall projects. I think it would also be great for underwater scenes.

Jennifer Scull said...

really cute technique! I think this would be fun with spring florals, too.